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FROM THE EDITORS:
Sherry Shaw
Len Roberson
University of North Florida

Looking back on 2014, we are keenly aware of world events that characterized the year since the JOI last published, including political instability, human rights violations, weather-related catastrophes, economic fragility, ethnic and religious discrimination, and international armed conflict. In the midst of it all, and usually behind the scenes, spoken and signed language interpreters were working. At times, the media brought interpreters into the spotlight, resulting in public attention to our work. For example, thanks to media coverage in 2014, the world learned more about the function and value of Certified Deaf Interpreters, which certainly gives us a cause for celebration.

In light of all that is happening around us, the JOI has a massive vision to disseminate the latest research and ideas that will inform our practice and consequently influence our personal performance and involvement within the larger professional community, perhaps contributing resolution to problems that affect us all. Within the pages of this JOI issue, readers will learn about coping strategies in stressful settings, intentional teaming, ergonomics in video relay interpreting, and assessment of distance delivery within interpreting programs. Some of the authors featured in this issue may be familiar to you, while others are new to the publishing arena. All of them have our utmost respect. They worked diligently to write and re-write to get their work ready for publication. The most incredible thing about the authors featured here is that they are extremely busy professionals who made the decision to document their work, collaborate on manuscript development, and work through the long review process for the purpose of spreading information through print. The labor involved in this process does not come from spare time. It comes from finding minutes in busy schedules and taking hours away from family and friends to concentrate on the task of writing. As your editors, we suggest a toast to our colleagues who saw the process through from start to finish!

Publishing the JOI is our honor. We want to make the publishing process manageable for authors, whether they are experienced or new to academic journals. We are always looking for ways to streamline the process, so we hope you will send your suggestions our way. Lastly, we could not publish the JOI without the devotion of reviewers from around the globe. Their job is to decide which manuscripts are ready for publication and which ones need more work. Without faltering and always as willing volunteers, each reviewer may work on up to three manuscripts during one year’s submissions. It is a lot to ask of busy people, but the JOI’s editorial team shares the vision for enlightenment, improved performance, and an educated workforce of qualified and ethical interpreters. May 2015 bring solutions to world issues not realized in 2014, and may your work as interpreters, community partners, agency owners, intercultural communicators, and interpreter educators be rewarding.

Sherry Shaw and Len Roberson


 

Journal of Interpretation

Co-Editors

  • Len Roberson, Ph.D. CI and CT, SC:L
  • Sherry Shaw, Ed.D. CSC

Editorial Board

  • Glenn Anderson, Ph.D.
  • Karen Bontempo, Ph.D.
  • Robert G. Lee, M.A., CI and CT
  • Carol J. Patrie, Ph.D., CSC, CI and CT, SC:L
  • Deb Russell, Ph.D., COI
  • Dr. Nanci Scheetz, CSC
  • Barbara J. Shaffer, Ph.D., CI and CT, SC:L
  • Linda Stauffer, Ph.D., M.Ed., CSC, OTC
  • Myra Taff-Watson, CSC
  • Sarka Timarova

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