Here are the workshop descriptions, divided up by the days that they are scheduled.

Saturday August 8, 2015

(Saturday’s workshop schedule here.)

RID Orientation for First Timers/Students: An Introduction to a Productive Conference Experience This session is designed to introduce first time conference attendees to the structure, schedule, and processes of the national event. Support resources will be identified. Key persons for specific information will be introduced. The goal of the event is to enable first timers to feel comfortable and confident as they navigate the schedule and venue and interact with other attendees. Participants in the Conference Mentor Program may connect and plan their conference interaction during this event. (1 hour) 0.1 CEUs. General Studies (GS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Educational Interpreting: Current Practices In 2010, the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, awarded a grant (H325K100234) to the UNC-DO IT Center that focused on improving the services of interpreters in educational settings. The findings of four significant explorations into the work world of educational interpreters will be shared in this presentation. This includes a review of state standards, a national survey, a national summit, and the analysis of the EIPA databases. The overarching goal of the grant was to better understand the day-to-day practice of K-12 interpreters in order to prepare these related service providers as highly qualified members of the educational team. Plenary (1 hour 15 minutes) 0.125 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Preparing Interpreters for Tomorrow: Report on a Study of Emerging Trends in Interpreting and Implications for Interpreter Education Cathy Cogen and Dennis Cokely will report on their recent study of emerging trends in interpreting and implications for interpreter education. The presentation will be organized into three primary sections: First, trends impacting current and future interpreting services assesses external trend areas that are broad in nature and have many long-term implications for the field of professionals providing services to individuals who are d/Deaf. Second, current issues in Interpreter Education describes several key dynamics at play within the field that may facilitate or impede efforts to address future interpreter education and professional development needs. Lastly, the final section of the presentation offers recommendations for aligning interpreter education with the challenges of tomorrow. In many areas, the recommendations mark a significant departure from old ways of doing business. And we will issue a call to action, asking conference attendees to consider how they will participate – as practitioners, educators, researchers, and administrators. What partnerships, practices, and policies will they engage in and support toward creating a better future? Plenary (1 hour 15 minutes) 0.125 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Interpreters and Transliterators of Color Member Section
Interpreters in Educational and Instructional Settings Members Section IEIS Professional Discussion Interpreters in Educational and Instructional Settings Members Section (IEISMS) will meet for a professional discussion and 2015-2016 council elections. Members and non-members are invited and encouraged to attend. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. General Studies (GS). Spoken English
Board Forum: Executive Director Search and Transition Process This forum, designed for RID affiliate chapter members, will give participants the opportunity to meet the Transition Team and Third Sector New England (TSNE) and understand their roles in guiding the transition process. Conference promises to be a key source of diverse input from members. Members will be encouraged to actively engage in their role to provide input to guide the process and the development of the profile of the Executive Director. TSNE will document the data to compile and analyze. Board Fourm (1 hour) 0.1 CEUs. General Studies (GS). ASL (American Sign Language)
The More We Change, the More We Stay the Same: Examining Conflict in Interpreting A basic truth in any interpreted interaction is that the Deaf and hearing participants, as well as the interpreters, are all human, hoping for a successful interaction that includes acknowledgement, mutual respect, and understanding. Even with this common goal, conflict happens. One way to understand conflict is by analyzing complaints filed against interpreters within the RID Ethical Practices System (EPS.)This session will provide a data comparison from a 2007 analysis of EPS complaints filed against interpreters and recent study looking at comparable data. Similarities and differences will be highlighted. Resources from the EPS, dispute resolution, and mediation practices will be offered and practiced so that interpreters may successfully address interpreting-related conflict. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Interpreting in Education: Your Role in Transforming Practice There is a common belief that aspects of interpreting work apply only to community interpreters. This workshop will explore the application of the Code of Professional Conduct, employment of Deaf Interpreters, and Role-Space to educational interpreting. We will consider values implicit in the CPC and EIPA Code of Ethics and discuss codes as guidelines for decision-making rather than behavioral rules. We will also explore the potential contributions of Deaf Interpreters in K-12 settings and systemic and attitudinal barriers to their involvement. An overview of Role-Space (Llewellyn-Jones & Lee) will also be presented, along with an analysis of how it might apply in educational settings. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). Spoken English
The HIghs of High-Visual Interpreting in Educational Settings There are Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing students in interpreted school settings with little or no exposure to American Sign Language (e.g., those that are very young, from other countries, started with an oral English approach, etc). Students with this “High Visual Orientation” (M. Hopper, 2002) have limited (or no) opportunities for direct-ASL instruction from Deaf/hearing staff/CDIs. The educational interpreter is responsible for equivalent and readily understandable ASL translations. Though this is a daunting task, it is a rewarding experience! This workshop provides ways to meet this goal. Participants will practice these techniques with academic source materials. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS).ASL (American Sign Language & Spoken English)
Leading Interpreters: A Fresh Look at Research and Practice How do you keep volunteers productive? How do you resolve conflicts with colleagues? How do you manage perceptions of others? And, how do you keep from accidentally blowing up the whole dang organization? By looking at research, participants will discover how their actions influence their effectiveness as leaders. Learn how seemingly inconsequential decisions such as the color of your shirt and your lunch schedule affect both your own and others’ decision-making. Discuss the deep influences of human biology on personal success and the effectiveness of groups. In short, ditch catch-phrase and gimmicky leadership techniques in favor of research and science. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. ASL (American Sign Language)
Are You Competent to Interpret Legal Competency Hearings and Evaluations? Forensic assessment involves the intersection of mental health and the judicial system. Defendants have a right to assist in their own defense by communicating freely with their attorneys and confronting witnesses. Some Deaf defendants, due to lack of language, mental illness, or cognitive impairment may be unable to assist in their own defense. The presenters, Tomina J. Schwenke, PhD, CI, CT, QMHI, Amy Peterson, MS, CDI and Tara Potterveld, MA, CI, CT, SC:L, will discuss legal procedures and principles, relevant court cases, forensic psychiatric assessments, Deaf/Hearing team interpreting and specialized knowledge needed to interpret issues of competency. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language), Spoken English
Making The Case for Deaf-Deaf Interpreting Teams Studies detailing team interpreting strategies and techniques have been traditionally conducted within non-Deaf interpreting teams. Preliminary research conducted on how a team of CDI/DIs work to provide interpretation services and specific CDI/DI interpreting strategies being utilized within educational settings at Gallaudet University will be shared. This workshop will build on concepts set forth by Hoza (2010) and Sforza (2013) to orient participants to the unique teaming strategies and concepts that have been used by DI teams, teaching participants how they can actively and effectively attend to the message and support a DI team member. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
The Business of Providing Interpreting Services Today: A Stakeholder Forum In this second stakeholder forum, three member sections (IDP, ISM, and DC) would like to further the conversation started in 2013 around what doable actions we are taking as agency owners, sole practitioners, and members of the community to foster positive collaboration. What is acceptable practice when bids for interpreting services are granted to multilingual agencies with no ties to the Deaf community? Are agencies who specialize in providing solely ASL/English interpreting becoming obsolete? When and why does our ethical fitness become compromised due to the business model of interpreting? What will we do to ensure that the communities we serve are involved in the procurement and decision making of interpreter services? Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
“C’est La Vie” This is Life! “C’est La Vie” This is Life! Brandi’s keynote will speak about her life experiences growing up Deaf, using interpreters and how interpreters gave been an instrumental part of her life. This will include how her life and work experiences have shaped her values, and describes a vision for a better, brighter future for both interpreters and customers. As the author of Finding Zoe, Brandi will address the lessons she has learned as a Deaf woman and what it means to come home to self and family. Keynote (1 hour) 0.1 CEUs. General Studies (GS). ASL (American Sign Language)

Sunday, August 9, 2015

(Sunday’s workshop schedule here.)

Invest in Your Future by Incorporating Another World Language into Your Work! This plenary presentation is a must attend if you want to learn about the rich history of Spanish in the U.S. and ways that you can invest in your future by becoming more knowledgeable and skilled in working with Spanish-speaking communities. You don’t want to miss learning about your opportunities for learning another major world language. You will learn about the various profiles of trilingual (Spanish-English-ASL) interpreters, from novices to experts. Perhaps you’ve taken Spanish courses before but never used the language professionally. You are perfect for this plenary workshop. If you are just curious, we would love to share with you how you can become a trilingual interpreter. We look forward to seeing you! Plenary (1 hour 15 minutes ) 0.125 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language), Spoken English, Spanish
Interpreting as an Intersubjective Discourse Activity This discussion will examine the intersubjective nature of interpreted discourse. We will discuss both implicit and explicit coding of interpreted discourse and how this is based on the interpreter’s construal of the information being expressed and the interpreter’s decisions regarding what to profile in the target message. Further, we suggest that understanding “contextualization” as a successful discourse strategy (Gile,1995), as part of interpretation into any target language, provides a useful approach for analyzing the expression of shared or non-shared knowledge. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS).ASL (American Sign Language)
The Contribution of Deaf Interpreters to Gatekeeping Within the Interpreting Profession This professional discussion examines the work of highly skilled Deaf interpreters working in the legal setting and in the vocational rehabilitation setting. Using the framework set forth by Wadensjo, the data was examined for the nature and number of interpreter initiated utterances and for the number and nature of the expanded renditions. The data suggests that Deaf interpreters intervene in the interpreting process more frequently than their hearing counterparts in a number of ways. This session shall set forth examples of interpreter initiated utterances and expanded renditions for participants to examine, discuss, and reflect on ways to incorporate these strategies into their work. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. ASL (American Sign Language)
It’s Time to Raise Interpreter Standards in Your State The incident with the unqualified interpreter at Nelson Mandela’s memorial service underscored the need to set standards for interpreters in the U.S. and across the globe. The use of unqualified interpreters is not an issue unique to South Africa. Here in the U.S., unqualified interpreters are working in courtrooms, hospitals, K-12 and postsecondary education, and other settings every day. This presentation will give you the tools you need to raise interpreting standards in your state through legislation. If we are to learn anything from Mandela, it is to create opportunity out of adversity and to use education to create change. Together we can raise interpreting standards in all 50 states! Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Word and World Knowledge Among Deaf Students With and Without Cochlear Implants Deaf students vary in their word and world knowledge and often overestimate their comprehension. Many Deaf students lack opportunities for incidental learning by “overhearing” language. Some studies have found that after receiving cochlear implants, Deaf children’s vocabulary increases, predicting that they will catch up with hearing students. Do they? This presentation examines world knowledge among hearing students, and Deaf students with and without CIs. It also examines the linguistic and metalinguistic abilities of these groups based on the difference between their formal and self-assessments. Do they know they don’t know? These findings have implications for interpreters working with Deaf students. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Spoken English
Educational Interpreters and Transition for Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Interpreters play a critical role in the provision of accommodations for students who are deaf or hard of hearing in secondary and postsecondary settings. There are significant differences in the role and responsibilities of interpreters between these two settings. As implicated by pepnet 2’s needs assessment, students are given little or no preparation on how to advocate and utilize accommodations beyond high school.This session will explore the role of the educational interpreter in effective transition planning, strategies for preparing students in the use of accommodations after high school, and discovering resources that can be used to foster autonomy. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Deaf-Hearing Interpreter Teams: Navigating Trust in Shared Space Deaf interpreters bring specific linguistic/cultural competencies to an interpreting assignment. Hearing interpreter counterparts also bring separate specific linguistic/cultural competencies. Together the team possesses the expertise to be effective in an interpreted interaction. Sometimes, however, interpretations don’t go as smoothly as envisioned. This talk will present findings from a graduate research study that explored how team role functionality when not clearly delineated, may contribute to the formation and perpetuation of mistrust within Deaf-hearing interpreter teams. Data indicated that trust issues exist within the team dynamic separate from role function. Applying Castelfranchi & Falcone’s (2010) trust theory analysis to the data, it is revealed how team members may or may not delegate trust to one another. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Condemned to Repetition? An Analysis of Problem-Setting and Problem-Solving in Sign Language Interpreting Ethics A profession learns from past mistakes and it’s these lessons that undoubtedly influence its ethical frame. However, in order to remain relevant, the ethical frame must avail itself to current practice issues. This study analyses examples of ethical content material in the interpreting profession to determine the past and present ethical discourse offered by the profession’s exemplars. It is concluded that ethical thought appears to remain imbedded in the concerns of the past, at the minimal standards of ethical practice, and therefore may not be sufficiently addressing broader ethical concerns for effective (and ethical) practice skills of sign language interpreters today. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). Spoken English
Leadership Panel The moderator will lead the panelists and attendees in an open and dynamic discussion of personal leadership styles, successes and challenges, and collaboration among organizations. Audience members may also ask questions of the panelists. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. General Studies (GS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Certification Committee: Status Up-Date on Certification Certification committee (CC) members will describe the various activities of the CC since the 2013 National Conference. Topics will include the NIC, CDI, SC:L, medical interpreting, oral certification, and the upcoming bylaws change. Information will be presented with time for questions and answers at the end of the presentation. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Pragmatically Speaking: WHY Are We Doing This? “Why,” “How,” “What,” or top-down processing in interpreting, often frustrates interpreters in educational settings. At times it is easier for the interpreter to process at the lexical (what) level, but doing so can interfere with learning and understanding for the Deaf students. DHH students are better served when interpreters process pragmatically, starting with the “why” first. This 5-hour workshop provides instruction and ample practice in processing at the pragmatic “why” level. Ensuring the interpretation includes the “why” enables the student to receive a message that is more rich and full. Practice with a variety of scenarios from the educational setting will help hone top-down processing skills. Extended Workshop (5 hours) 0.5 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). Spoken English
Utilizing Space in our ASL interpretations in Educational Settings Create visual space in your English-to-ASL interpretations! Make it meaningful! Many educational interpreters find they can keep up with lecture, but they get feedback that their signs aren’t “3-D”. Often what is missing is the ability to produce meaning in space. Using educational stimulus source material, participants will focus on real and token space, as well as developing techniques for keeping space consistent and strategies to employ when spatial relations change. Extended Workshop (5 hours) 0.5 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). Spoken English
Emergency Management Tool Kit for Interpreters and Affiliate Chapters The Tool Kit for Interpreters and Affiliate Chapters was designed to provide the information and resources necessary for interpreters, interpreter service providers, and affiliate chapters to partner with state and local governments. It will provide the tools interpreters need to address the challenges government faces when it comes to providing effective communication to the deaf and hard of hearing community in times of disaster. The Tool Kit provides step-by-step directions along with useful resources for making your affiliate chapter members safer, more resilient, and better prepared personally and professionally. Extended Workshop (5 hours) 0.5 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). Spoken English
Strategies for Interpreting Adolescent and Adult Psychological Assessments and Standardized Tests Given the intricacies required for the appropriate interpretation of psychological assessments, it is critical that interpreters not only possess the necessary linguistic abilities to facilitate communication, but they also must have a complete understanding of how specific interpretations can affect the validity of any given psychological assessment tool or instrument. During this workshop, participants will be introduced and oriented to six common types of assessments, and will develop appropriate interpretative strategies for maintaining test validity. Additionally, participants will learn the appropriate questions to ask a test administrator during a pre-session briefing to best orient himself or herself to the testing process. Workshop attendees will be divided into small groups and practice utilizing strategies learned during the workshop to interpret an actual assessment. Extended Workshop (5 hours) 0.5 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). Spoken English
You Drink Too Much: Understanding Alcoholism Alcoholism is a fatal disease, killing Deaf people who don’t have access to the resources presented in Alcoholics Anonymous meetings and literature. What is the difference between alcoholism and heavy drinking (alcohol abuse)? This distinction is of utmost importance when interpreting in AA. Using the “Big Book” as our guide, we will explore what alcoholism is, and how it affects alcoholics. We will examine concepts such as physical allergy, phenomenon of craving, obsession of the mind, and powerlessness. Of course, we will spend time strategizing approaches to translate and interpret these concepts effectively and appropriately. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Field Induction: Creating the Essential Elements for Competence in Specialized Settings The National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers (NCIEC) has developed supervised induction programs to further the in-service training continuum for individuals seeking to specialize in healthcare and legal interpreting. The presenters suggest that supervised induction offers support and direction for practitioners seeking specialized standing. This three hour workshop will provide an overview of the two induction programs currently being implemented by the NCIEC in selected locations, and describe the structure, goals and processes associated with each. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. ASL (American Sign Language)
VRS Interpreting: An Ethical Discussion This workshop will provide participants information and the opportunity for in-depth discussion about Video Relay Service (VRS) interpreting. Participants will analyze and discuss the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct (CPC) with respect to VRS work including respect for consumers, perceptions of consumer’s attitude, confidentiality, personal feelings vs. company policy, workplace culture, empowerment, and oppression. Techniques for providing dynamically equivalent interpreting and exceptional customer service will be reviewed and practiced through activities and discussions. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
ASL Conceptual Blending in Academics This workshop is specifically designed to foster the skills needed to present academic information such as math and science in ASL. During this 2nd day of intensive training, educational interpreters will be enhanced in classroom interpreting skills by actively participating in ASL conceptual blending using visual media & ASL conceptual blending in mathematics and science content. Participants will learn about surrogate space and ASL verb types and structures. With that foundation, they will move on to the art of creating rich academic ASL in educational settings. Extended Workshop (5 hours) 0.5 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Let the Good Times Roll–The Affiliate Chapter’s Guide to the Smooth Operation of a Fine-Tuned Machine The workshop, designed for affiliate chapter leaders, will provide a review of the structure of RID, delineate AC requirements, and generate goals for smoother operation. Participants will examine their roles as leaders and members in the organization at the affiliate chapter, regional, and national level. Specific topics of focus include: Common challenges that inlcude repair and maintenance of routine and rare malfunctions, filing the annual report, routine inspection, 501(c)(3) registration requirements, insurance requirements for venues including what proof of insurance do I need, apathy which includes increasing appealing cosmetic value while maintaining a smooth-running, dependable organization, and leadership which includes how can I become a master technician in the field? (1 hour) 0.1 CEUs. General Studies (GS). ASL (American Sign Language
Community Forum: Igenda or WEgenda: How do we define “we”? What is the place of the “I” in the interaction? The 2015 Community Forum, “Igenda or WEgenda: How do we define “we”? What is the place of the “I” in the interaction?” will address a range of issues such as: generational differences, the implications of the Deafhood movement for interpreters, the power of our words and exploring the difference between having access and having to ask for access, our interface with the emerging field of CDI’s and future trends in the Deaf and interpreting communities.
Moderators, Carol-Lee Aquiline and Lynnette Taylor will be joined by presenters Wing Butler, Patrick Graybill and Marvin Miller to frame the evening’s discussion. Dennis Cokely, Sarah Hafer and Erica West Oyedele will join in a panel discussion that follows.
Participants will have the opportunity to come together in small group discussions to respond to the issues raised and then share out in an open forum. Our goal is to identify a series of doable actions that can be taken individually and collectively. We close the evening by celebrating our cultural heritage with poetry from Patrick Graybill and David Rivera.Supported by Deaf Caucus and Interpreters with Deaf Parents Member Sections.
Forum (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)

Monday, August 10, 2015

(Monday’s workshop schedule here.)

Interpreters with Deaf Parents Member Section Explore and discuss the future for IDP and the importance of leadership. This discussion will determine doable actions by RID and IDP members to ensure the progression of Deaf parented leadership. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Collaborative Storytelling on Social Justice This plenary storytelling session is one of the best communication techniques that inspire while highlighting the best moments in a narrative style. These stories will set the stage for Tuesday’s Social Justice Roundtable. Stories will involve how we may discuss concerning trends,diversity and dismantling unwanted systems. Stories in this session will reflect on different aspects of social justice from their professional roles and life experiences. Participants leave having additional experiences to related to their own working stories. Plenary (1 hour 15 minutes ) 0.125 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language),
From “Do nothing” to “Do no harm”: Collaborative Values in Medical Interpreting The list of dos and don’ts apparent in most ethical codes prove unhelpful to those working within the complex social dynamics of community interpreting. Research shows that healthcare interpreters do not always abide by the rule-based approach but instead, base their decisions on contextual factors. This presentation examines the problems of interpreting’s context-based ethics when the guidance of their ethical codes proves insufficient. It also explores an ethical frame that appreciates context but expands the values of interpreting to include the values inherent in medical settings. Lastly, it proposes the use of case conferencing as a means through which interpreters develop critical thinking and ethical judgment. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). Spoken English
Educational Interpreter Boot Camp: Bridging the Gap from ITP to Working in Schools This presentation serves as a framework for interested parties in setting up an interpreter boot camp to assist in bridging the gap between graduation from an interpreter training program to working in the educational setting. The curriculum for this boot camp will be discussed in hopes that it can be replicated by other entities to provide the support needed for newer interpreters to become a qualified educational interpreter or to achieve the state minimum on the Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Native-like ASL Interactional Cues: Can They Be Taught? The outcomes of a recent survey reveal a dramatic difference in how the concept of “strong voicer” is conceptualized between interpreters and Deaf consumers (White & Multra Kraft, 2014). Deaf consumers value an effective relationship between the interpreter and the Deaf individual via interacting with native-like ASL cues. This presentation addresses these native-like cues in the classroom by overtly teaching them to a junior class at a 4-year program in interpreting. The data shared will include the pre- and post- knowledge and skill base of the students, the exercises, and overt instruction. The content of our discussions, group, and individual analyses, assignments and journals will be shared. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Asynchronous Video Translation and Production Techniques for CDIs In this presentation, I demonstrate technical solutions that CDIs can utilize to provide high-quality ASL translation of videotaped spoken English (or other spoken language) works. These solutions allow the CDI to competitively bid for jobs that they would normally be unable to do without the addition of a hearing interpreter. Without these skills, the customer could easily decide to forego the CDI completely.In this workshop we will progress from a standard spoken English video, all the way through to a joint ASL/English video. We will also discuss how to partner with video professionals (how to speak their language) to get optimum results. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
NAD/RID Reputable Agency Task Force – Report on 2013-2015 Committee Work The NAD/RID Reputable Agency Task Force (RATF) was established in 2013 as a response to Motion C2011.02 and charged with investigating how to identify reputable agencies. This was a response to the growing number of complaints about unethical business practices and service provision by some referral agencies.In this professional discussion, RATF will report back to the members on its findings from the national surveys as well as the responses and suggestions from the five regional conference forums. RATF will also share its recommendations to the Board for future actions. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Healthcare Interpreting Career Lattice In this professional discussion, we present a career lattice, developed by the CATIE Center/NCIEC, as a means for current and potential interpreters to better understand the progression toward autonomous competency in healthcare interpreting. Participants will learn about career lattices in other practice professions, the need for such a lattice in the interpreting profession, and the process used for developing the current version. We will describe the various entry and exit points and highlight relevant educational resources for interpreters along the lattice. Finally we will present how we see this model evolving and the potential uses for interpreting practitioners, educators, healthcare administrators, and employers. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Interpreting in International, Multilingual and Multicultural Contexts This presentation features the perspectives of interpreters and consumers from various ethnic backgrounds and geographic locations, including Deaf and hearing, Native and non-Native individuals. It is geared to new or experienced interpreters working in culturally and linguistically diverse communities, particularly international contexts or indigenous communities. The presentation highlights recent developments in the field of sign language interpretation involving Deaf people and community members using indigenous orregional sign language varieties like American Indian Sign Language and Caribbean Sign Language varieties. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). Spoken English
VIs and Burnout Video interpreters experience burnout in a variety of ways unique to the environment we work in. This workshop will define burnout experienced by video interpreters, examples of possible burnout, address current research on best practices regarding burnout, discuss current techniques for dealing with burnout, provide opportunity for role play scenarios, and engage participants in group discussion. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. ASL (American Sign Language)
Survey Results and Recommendation to Revise the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct This information session summarizes the work of the 2014-2015 CPC Review Committee. We will explain the themes and concerns from data collection (member surveys, literature review, workshops, meetings) that led us to formally recommend that the NAD and RID Boards revise the CPC. The core recommendation is to shift from a rules-based to a rights-based Code of Ethics. We will explain these two types of codes, show examples that illustrate differences between them, and share the outline of the strategy we proposed to the NAD and RID Boards as a way to move forward with the revision process. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Video Interpreting Member Section Professional Discussion The RID Video Interpreter Member Section meeting will share member feedback on a variety of projects that are in process and provide opportunities for members to get informed and get involved in small, simple ways. We will also share our vision for the 2015-2017 term, as well as introduce new and continuing Council Members. Come see what your member section has been working on and how we plan on continuing to support video interpreters. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. General Studies (GS). ASL (American Sign Language)

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

(Tuesday’s workshop schedule here.)

Interpreters in Healthcare Member Section Come meet the membership of the Interpreters in Healthcare Member Section. This is a chance for interpreters working within the medical and mental health settings an opportunity for open discussion and the exchange of ideas and concerns among members who work within these various healthcare settings. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.025 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Mentoring and ITP Students: Current Trends Come learn about a recent study conducted at two ITPs, one at the university level and the other at the community college level. Research results from this qualitative study on the mentoring process will be presented. A discussion of what mentors and mentees thought were the most beneficial approaches and what, if any, tools were utilized in the mentoring process will be facilitated. Presenters will also discuss current trends in mentoring of ITP students and allow time for open discussion of the topic. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Trauma-Informed Interpreting: Domestic and Sexual Violence Part 1 This workshop examines domestic violence and sexual violence (DV/SV) within American society and the Deaf community. We will discuss concepts of power and control, trauma, and the ways DV/SV is experienced within the Deaf community. We will focus on the interpreting task in various settings, and will discuss language use, vicarious trauma, boundary setting, self-care, safety, and partnering with a CDI. This workshop was developed by, and in collaboration with, the Vera Institute of Justice’s Center on Victimization and Safety. Trigger warning: the topics discussed will be graphic and “heavy,” so participants will be encouraged to practice self-care. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Interpreter Accountability: How do Interpreters’ Choices Impact Consumers? We begin by examining the power that interpreters hold in communication and the impact we have on consumers’ lives based on our ability to accurately interpret their discourse (by considering “their world” instead of “our world”). Using Deborah Tannen’s (1994) research on communication as our framework, we will examine dynamic equivalence, clarifying techniques, gender influences, powerless language and analyze utilizing “normal” pausing, clarifying techniques, hedging, and other linguistic devices, in order to facilitate communication. Participants will also discuss strategies to utilize in situations in which background, culture, communication patterns, and/or contextual information is absent or limited. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Case Conferencing and the CDI – Part 1 Deaf Interpreters (DIs) have been increasing in numbers yet the approach to discussing the work has typically been guided by traditional methods to training and frameworks that non-Deaf interpreters experience. This workshop aims to provide insight on approaches to effective and culturally/linguistically appropriate case conferencing as demonstrated by Dean & Pollard (2001) and Keller (2012) supported by samples collected during case conferencing sessions conducted by CDIs at Gallaudet University. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Social Justice Roundtable: Talk it Out Consciously The Social Justice Roundtable promotes participants to engage in meaningful exchanges around anti-oppression and social justice issues as they relate to the working and living experience of interpreters and those they serve. The forum serves to support those who are members of marginalized groups and to educate participants on issues of oppression, discrimination, and social justice. Participants will have opportunities participant in discussions, network with others, and learn from current events. We acknowledge that there is room for improvement both culturally and structurally within our society, we value involvement of people of diverse backgrounds within our field. The Social Justice Forum hopes to facilitate political and social awareness, gather varied perspectives, pass on positive images of discussions, and make the interpreting field more inclusive for future professionals. Forum (4 hours) 0.4 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

(Wednesday’s workshop schedule here.)

StreetLeverage-X Street Leverage—X is a fast moving, interactive session designed to spark reflection, critical thinking and personal accountability among sign language interpreters in an effort to rethink the way we understand, practice and tell the story of the sign language interpreter. Themes addressed in this session include: cultural competence, colleague dynamics, impacts of fear, industry power structures, ethics and practitioner core values.Plenary (1 hour 15 minutes) 0.125 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Street Leverage Professional Discussion The evolution of the field of sign language interpreting has been propelled by various innovations and disruptions large and small. This progression has lead to many iterative enhancements to both educational methodologies and the practice of interpreting. While many advancements have been made, this evolution has also created a number of infrastructure “gaps” worthy of examination and industry investment. This fast paced session will engage panelists and audience members in a collective analysis of a few of the challenges troubling the field of sign language interpreting and how they might be addressed. Professional Discussion (1.5 hours) 0.15 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Thawing Out the Guilty Plea: Frozen Legal Text in Translation, a Teaming Workshop The guilty plea litany presents a unique challenge for the Deaf/hearing or Deaf/CDI interpreter team. The team must work together to interpret attorney-client meetings and to translate frozen texts to create an accurate and accessible message that meets the standards of the legal interpreting profession and judicial requirements. The challenge is to create translations and interpretations that meet the needs of the Deaf defendant who is considering pleading guilty without over- or under-stepping our roles. The skills developed in this workshop will be applicable to a wide variety of court and legal settings where frozen texts are utilized. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
The Voices Behind the Hidden Treasure of Black ASL: Its History and Structure The Hidden Treasure of Black ASL: Its History and Structure is the first empirical study to address the factors that influenced the development of Black ASL. Members of the interpreting team who provided translation services for the accompanying DVD will discuss the process and approaches used to produce the voice over track. Participants will work in small groups to use the techniques discussed by the team to translate a segment of the DVD. The goal of the workshop is to assist participants in analyzing their approach to interpreting in culturally rich environments such as those relating to age, race, gender, and social class. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language), Spoken English
Trauma-Informed Interpreting: Domestic and Sexual Violence Part 2 This workshop examines domestic violence and sexual violence (DV/SV) within American society and the Deaf community. We will discuss concepts of power and control, trauma, and the ways DV/SV is experienced within the Deaf community. We will focus on the interpreting task in various settings, and will discuss language use, vicarious trauma, boundary setting, self-care, safety, and partnering with a CDI. This workshop was developed by, and in collaboration with, the Vera Institute of Justice’s Center on Victimization and Safety. Trigger warning: the topics discussed will be graphic and “heavy,” so participants will be encouraged to practice self-care. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Understanding Trans* Identities and Terminology: ASL and English We all have a gender identity. If you have the privilege of congruency between your gender identity and sex assigned at birth you may not have to think much about it. This workshop encourages exploration of gender identity and language use in order to respectfully serve consumers of interpreting services. This workshop begins with a basic foundation of ‘beyond the gender binary;’ analyzing language and its relationship to gender, with a focus on Trans* identities and experiences. The presenters will share their personal stories to emphasize how the gender binary, and privilege, impacts our lives and work as interpreters, and the broader community. Discussions will support interpreters in making respectful language choices and building community allyship.[Workshop title footnote: Trans* with an asterisks “makes special note in an effort to include all non-cisgender gender identities, including transgender, transsexual, transvestite, genderqueer, genderfluid, non-binary, genderless, agender, non-gendered, third gender, two-spirit, bigender, and trans man and trans woman” (Killerman, 2014).] Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)
Case Conferencing and the CDI – Part 2 Deaf Interpreters (DIs) have been increasing in numbers yet the approach to discussing the work has typically been guided by traditional methods to training and frameworks that non-Deaf interpreters experience. This workshop aims to provide insight on approaches to effective and culturally/linguistically appropriate case conferencing as demonstrated by Dean & Pollard (2001) and Keller (2012) supported by samples collected during case conferencing sessions conducted by CDIs at Gallaudet University. Workshop (3 hours) 0.3 CEUs. Professional Studies (PS). ASL (American Sign Language)